The mission of the music program at Kew-Forest is to develop the unique abilities and potential of each student by offering a student-focused, developmentally appropriate, and enriched educational program. We prioritize knowledge building, skill building, and character development within a rich and varied program throughout the grade levels. Using the vehicles of singing, movement, and playing instruments, students at The Kew-Forest School model as listeners and creative participants. In addition to embracing traditional elements of music, our curriculum also explores music technology, audio recording, and contemporary musical styles that will allow students to continue to grow and appreciate music for years to come. 
 
All students engage in performances, with opportunities to perform during assemblies, grade-level performances, and all-school concerts. ECD and Kindergarten perform in a Valentine’s Day concert; first and second grades sing in a Memorial Day performance; third and fourth graders have a Thanksgiving performance; and fifth graders perform in a Moving Up celebration.

List of 7 items.

  • Early Childhood Development

    The Early Childhood Development music program fosters an atmosphere where students can express themselves in an imaginative and fun setting. Our curriculum includes group participation where students explore and create various avenues of music. ECD students attend music classes twice a week for a 30-minute period.
     
    ECD music focuses on several musical fundamentals, which help serve as building blocks into the world of music. Through a combined Orff/Suzuki/Dalcroze approach, singing, rhythm, movement and listening are all ways of expressing our music foundation. Our repertoire reflects our diverse community, working with varied folk songs from all around the world. 
     
    Students learn rhythm through the use of body percussion such as claps, pats and other handheld auxiliary percussion instruments in the room. Classes use call and response for most rhythmic activities and students are encouraged to create and improvise four-beat patterns. 
     
    The movement and listening lessons in the class allow the children to move as artistic examples of how the music makes them feel. "Can you Hear It?" and "Carnival of the Animals" are two of the records used for scarf and mirror dancing activities. These songs focus on the beat, tempo, dynamics, and instrumentation so that children can recognize these fundamentals while listening.
  • Kindergarten

    The Kindergarten music program fosters an environment where students can express themselves in an imaginative and fun setting. Our curriculum includes group participation where students explore creative ways of surrounding themselves in music. Kindergarteners attend music classes twice a week for a 45-minute period.
     
    The Kindergarten class expands from the Early Childhood curriculum, continuing the focus on music fundamentals that help serve as building blocks into the world of music. Through a combined Orff/Suzuki/Dalcroze approach to teaching, students use singing, rhythm, movement, and listening techniques. 
     
    In Kindergarten, the Orff/Xylophone program and Suzuki Pre-Recorder (small recorder with raised finger holes) programs are also introduced. Students use the sing-a-long book “We All Sing with the Same Voice,” as well as introducing patriotic songs to mold their singing voices, while gaining confidence performing among their peers. Students learn rhythm through the use of body percussion such as claps, pats and other handheld auxiliary percussion instruments such as rhythm sticks and boom sticks. Kindergarteners use call and response for most rhythmic activities, but are also encouraged to create and improvise four and eight beat patterns using the rhythmic syllables “doo and day-day.” 
     
    The movement and listening lessons in the class allow the children to move as artistic examples of how the music makes them feel. "Can you Hear It?" and "Carnival of the Animals" are two of the records used for scarf and brain dancing activities. These songs focus on the beat, tempo, dynamics, and instrumentation so that children can recognize these elements of music while listening. Students also begin reading and comprehending music notation.
  • First Grade

    The first grade music program fosters an atmosphere where students can express themselves in an imaginative and fun setting. The curriculum includes group participation where students explore creative ways of surrounding themselves in music. First graders attend music classes twice a week for a 45-minute period.
     
    Through a combined Orff/Suzuki/Dalcroze approach to teaching, students use singing, playing instruments, rhythm, movement, and listening techniques. First graders use the sing-a-long book “We All Sing with the Same Voice,” as well as exploring different types of music from around the world that are peace and harmony-themed. Listening to music from other cultures helps children better their singing voices, using bigger ranges and a better tone. Singing daily also builds a stronger, more confident character, which helps when it comes time to perform. 
     
    The Orff/Xylophone program and Suzuki Pre-Recorder, a small recorder with raised finger holes, are the two instruments that are chosen first grade. Students learn rhythm through the use of body percussion such as claps, pats and other handheld auxiliary percussion instruments such as rhythm sticks and drum circles. First graders use call and response for most rhythmic activities, but students are also encouraged to create and improvise four-beat patterns using the rhythmic syllables “doo, dah, and day-day” to represent quarter, half, and eighth notes. 
     
    The movement and listening lessons in the class allow the children to move as artistic examples of how the music makes them feel. "Playing for Change" and "Kids Can Listen, Kids Can Move" are two of the records used for Scarf, Brain, and Mirror dancing activities, focusing on the beat, tempo, dynamics, and instrumentation so that children can recognize these elements of music while listening and reacting.
  • Second Grade

    The second grade music program creates an environment where students can express themselves in a fun and imaginative setting. All of the activities include group participation where students explore creative ways of surrounding themselves in music. Second graders attend music classes twice a week for a 45-minute period.
     
    Through a combined Orff/Suzuki/Dalcroze approach to teaching, students use singing, playing instruments, rhythm, movement, and listening. Second graders use the sing-a-long book “We All Sing with the Same Voice” as well as exploring different types of music from around the world that are peace and harmony-themed. Listening to music from other cultures helps children better their singing voices, using bigger ranges and a better tone. Singing daily also builds a stronger, more confident individual, which helps when it comes time to perform. 
     
    The Orff/Xylophone program and Suzuki Recorder programs are the two instruments that are chosen for this grade level. Children play these instruments in small groups and orffestrations. Children learn two to three parts per song and break into groups and play songs combining all parts at the same time, creating an “orffestra.” Students learn rhythm through the use of body percussion such as claps and pats, and other handheld auxiliary percussion instruments such as rhythm sticks and drum circles. Students apply the percussion instruments into our songs to make more parts playing at once. Second graders also use call and response for other rhythmic activities, but students are encouraged to create and improvise four-beat patterns using the rhythmic syllables “doo, dah, doe, day-day,” and rests to represent quarter, half, whole, and eighth notes. 
     
    The movement and listening lessons in the class allow the children to move as artistic examples of how the music makes them feel. "Playing for Change" and "Kids Can Listen, Kids Can Move" are two of the records used for Mirror and Brain dancing activities. These songs focus on the beat, tempo, dynamics, and instrumentation so that children can recognize these elements of music while listening.
  • Third Grade

    The third grade music program fosters an atmosphere where students can expand on their skills and knowledge learned in the earlier stages of elementary music. The curriculum includes group participation where students explore creative ways of surrounding themselves in music. Third grade attends music classes twice a week for a 45-minute period.
     
    Through a combined Orff/Suzuki/Dalcroze approach to teaching, students use singing, playing instruments, rhythm, movement, and listening techniques. Third graders also explore different types of music from around the world that are peace and harmony themed. Listening to music from other cultures help children better their singing voices, using bigger ranges and a better tone. Students also work on breathing, vowel shape, and projection which help mature their singing voices. Singing daily also builds a stronger, more confident character, which helps when it comes time for their performances. 
     
    The Orff/Xylophone program and Suzuki Recorder programs are the two instruments that are chosen for this grade level. Children play these instruments in small groups and orffestrations. Children learn four to six parts per song and break into groups and play songs combining all parts at the same time, creating an “orffestra.”  Students learn rhythm through the use of body percussion such as claps and pats, and other handheld auxiliary percussion instruments such as rhythm sticks and boom sticks. Students apply the percussion instruments into our songs to make more parts playing at once. Third graders also use call and response for other rhythmic activities, but students are also encouraged to create and improvise four-beat patterns using the rhythmic syllables “doo, dah, doe, day-day, di-di-di-di” and rests that represent quarter, half, whole, eighth, and sixteenth notes.
     
    “Style of the Month” is introduced in the third grade. Each month focuses on a new style of music where students talk about the history, composers, and instrumentation of different music genres around the world. The movement and listening lessons in the class allow the children to move as artistic examples of how the music makes them feel. "Playing for Change" and "International Peace" are two of the records used for scarf, mirror and brain dancing activities. These songs focus on the beat, tempo, and dynamics so that children can recognize these elements of music while listening.
  • Fourth Grade

    The fourth grade music program creates an environment where students can express themselves in a fun and artistic setting. Activities include group participation where students explore creative ways of surrounding themselves in music. Fourth grade students attend music classes twice a week for a 45-minute period.
     
    Singing, playing instruments, rhythm, movement, and listening are all ways that fourth graders express themselves in music. Students also explore different types of music from around the world that are peace and harmony-themed. Listening to music from other cultures help children better their singing voices, helping them use bigger ranges and a better tone. We also work on breathing, vowel shape, and projection that help mature their singing voices. Singing daily builds a stronger, more confident character, which also helps when it comes time to perform. 
     
    Fourth graders use the Orff/Xylophone program and Melody Chime programs. Children play these instruments in full group orffestrations. Children learn between four and 12 parts per song and break into groups and play songs combining all parts at the same time, creating an “orffestra.”  Students read music notation on the staff and learn to follow their harmonic assignments through accompanying melody and with use of chords structures. Students learn rhythm through the use of body percussion such as claps, snaps, and pats, and other handheld auxiliary percussion instruments such as rhythm sticks, drums and tambourines. Students apply the percussion instruments into our songs to make more parts playing at once. Fourth graders use call and response for other rhythmic activities, but are also encouraged to create and improvise four-beat patterns using the rhythmic syllables “doo, dah, doe, day-day, di-di-di-di,” and rests to represent quarter, half, whole, eighth, and sixteenth notes.
     
    As in third grade, “Style of the Month” is a focus in the fourth grade. Each month spotlights a new style of music where students talk about the history, composers, and instrumentation of different music genres around the world. Students also analyze pieces of music while picking out elements such as instrumentation, chord quality, and mood during our “Listening Logs.”
  • Fifth Grade

    The fifth grade music program creates an environment where students can express themselves in a fun and artistic setting. Fifth grade attends music class three times a week for a 45-minute period, experiencing group participation where students explore creative ways of surrounding themselves in music. 
     
    Singing, playing instruments, rhythm, movement, and listening are all ways in which students express themselves in fifth grade. Fifth graders hear popular world music that encourages them to build character and helps them to become a more well-rounded student. Students also work on breathing, vowel shape, and projection that help mature their singing voices. Singing daily builds their vocal range, and helps produce a better tone that allows them to become a stronger, more confident singer. 
     
    As in fourth grade, students use The Orff/Xylophone program and Melody Chime programs. Children play these instruments in full group “orffestrations”. Children learn between four and twelve parts per song and break into groups and play songs combining all parts at the same time, creating an “orffestra.” Students read music notation on the staff and learn to follow their harmonic assignments through accompanying melody and with use of chords structures. Fifth graders learn rhythm through the use of body percussion such as claps, snaps, and pats, and other handheld auxiliary percussion instruments such as rhythm sticks, drums and tambourines. Students apply the percussion instruments into their songs to make more parts playing at once.
     
    Students begin to read music in the fifth grade. Music theory, the staff, and recognition of musical terms are all introduced at this level. Students model their understanding in theory during their own compositions using a software program called Finale. They write their own pieces and use Notion to plug them into manuscript. This unit ends with a performance in front of their peers of their original piece of music.
     
    Fifth graders also participate in “Style of the Month,” learning about a new style of music through the history, composers, and instrumentation of different music genres around the world. Students also analyze pieces of music while picking out elements such as instrumentation, chord quality, and mood during our “Listening Logs.”

The Kew-Forest School

119-17 Union Turnpike
Forest Hills, NY 11375
(718) 268-4667
The oldest independent school in the borough of Queens, The Kew-Forest School is an independent co-educational, college preparatory school for students in Early Childhood Development (ECD) to 12th Grade.