Through participation in the Physical Education curriculum, students develop knowledge and practices necessary to obtain personal physical fitness and wellness values applicable throughout their lives. The Physical Education program provides movement-centered and knowledge-based activities in a safe environment that meets the emotional, physical, social, and intellectual needs of the students. 
 
The program is well balanced, offering diverse activities that provide students with the opportunity to develop and enhance their fitness levels over time, as well as to acquire the knowledge to maintain a lifetime of active participation. Achievement in the program provides the foundation for a legacy of success in physical activity and helps ensure that students will enjoy and sustain active lifestyles. Throughout the year, all students prepare for the school’s annual Field Day competition, where they get to demonstrate the skills they have learned all year. In addition, sportsmanship and the importance of playing fairly and safely are strongly stressed across all grades, with students always saying “good game” to one another after completing an activity.  
 
Students in Second through Fifth Grades also participate in a twice-monthly Health and Wellness class. Each class is 30 minutes and touches upon topics such as nutrition, hygiene, sportsmanship, and friendship, amongst others, in an age-appropriate method. The students are given the opportunity to bring concerns of their own to class and peer relationships are addressed in an open-forum setting.

List of 7 items.

  • Early Childhood Development

    The emphasis in the Early Childhood Development (ECD) physical education is on how students move in their environment. Throughout the year, the ECD class will focus on movement and body/space awareness in Physical Education. Each class period begins with running laps and stretching techniques, such as touching toes and butterfly stretches. Students will participate in activities and work on skills to develop cardiovascular and muscular fitness through fundamental motor skills such as running, hopping, skipping, jumping, sliding, and galloping, non-locomotor skills such as bending, twisting, turning, rocking, swaying, balancing, stretching, pushing, and pulling, and manipulative skills such as rolling, throwing, catching, bouncing, and kicking. 
     
    They will also learn teamwork and cooperation skills through play, games, and the use of manipulatives including scooters, beach balls, soccer balls, basketballs, tricycles, beanbags and soft striking implements like children’s golf clubs and baseball bats. These activities encourage independent learning as well as cooperative sharing with others.
  • Kindergarten

    As in Early Childhood, the Kindergarten will focus on movement, motor skills, and sportsmanship throughout the year. Students learn fundamental locomotor skills such as running, hopping, skipping, jumping, sliding, and galloping, as well as non-locomotor skills such as bending, twisting, turning, rocking, swaying, balancing, stretching, pushing, and pulling, and manipulative skills such as rolling, throwing, catching, bouncing, and kicking. Students participate in a wide variety of activities that involve locomotor, non-locomotor and manipulative skills, stretching techniques, fitness concepts and fitness development exercises.
     
    In addition to the use of manipulatives to promote gross motor skills, students will also be introduced to team sports such as soccer and pinball. They also learn sportsmanship and teamwork skills through a variety of activities and games such as Mr. Fox, Cats and Dogs, Sharks and Minnows, Warden, Pinball, and Steal the Bacon.
  • First Grade

    In first grade, students enjoy twice-weekly structured Phys. Ed. classes, as well as daily recess periods on our outdoor playground (weather permitting) or in our gym. First grade Physical Education builds upon the foundation of gross motor skills introduced in Early Childhood and Kindergarten. At this stage of development, Phys. Ed. instruction is focused on “Moving through Space and Time.” Activities are designed to help students explore different qualities of movement, such as speed, force, flow, level, direction, and pathway. By running, hopping, skipping, jumping, sliding, and galloping, the students develop their coordination and locomotor skills; non-locomotor skills are built through bending, twisting, turning, rocking, swaying, balancing, stretching, pushing, and pulling. Coordination skills such as throwing, catching, kicking, and dribbling are also introduced.
     
    Students will also be introduced to strength skills such as push-ups, sit-ups, lunges, and planks. Students are given opportunities to lead their classmates in stretches and warm-ups to foster leadership skills. In addition, they are taught the fundamentals of team sports, and frequently enjoy chase-and-flee games, such as “Lava Man” and “Capture the Flag.” 
     
    The overall goal is to instill in each child a love of fitness, while also encouraging individual achievement, teamwork, and positive sportsmanship. The program is well-balanced, offering diverse activities that provide students with the opportunity to develop and enhance their fitness levels over time and acquire the wellness knowledge necessary to inspire a lifetime of healthful choices.
  • Second Grade

    Second grade Physical Education reinforces skills already introduced and adding age-appropriate challenges in both skills and strategy in a fun and safe environment. Second grade introduces students to a variety of team-based sports and focuses on fine-tuning locomotor and non-locomotor skills.  Each class period begins with running laps and a series of stretches and strength activities, such as superman, pancake, and push-ups.
     
    Team sports are focused on such as soccer, hockey, and basketball, as well as more strategic dodging games such as Capture the Flag. These games encourage teamwork and cooperation to help students improve sportsmanship skills and take responsibility for their actions. Coordination skills are reinforced and students practice these skills during games and sports. Second graders are also taught how to be a team captain and are able to choose teams themselves. They also lead the class warm-ups by choosing three stretches or strength activities, as well as a warm-up game.
  • Third Grade

    Third grade Physical Education adds age appropriate challenges in both skills and strategy in a fun and safe environment. The emphasis in third grade Physical Education is on how students react and respond to others and perform well-defined combinations of movements. Students learn to develop patterns and combinations of movements using locomotor and non-locomotor skills. They also work together to analyze their performance in order to learn or improve a movement skill. Each class period begins with running laps and a series of stretches and strength activities, such as jumping jacks, sit-ups, and push-ups.
     
    Third graders increase their skill level and techniques in team sports such as soccer, basketball, kickball, baseball, dodgeball, team handball, volleyball, Running Bases, pinball, Warden, and Capture the Flag, and they are introduced to the sport of floor hockey. Students continue to show leadership through leading the warm-ups and being team captains.
  • Fourth Grade

    Fourth graders begin the year in Physical Education by participating in the Presidential Fitness Challenge for the first time. Fourth grade students engage in strength training exercises including hand weights, and participate in the Presidential Fitness Challenge. They participate in a variety of fitness tests such as pull-ups, sit-ups, shuttle run, sit and reach, and the mile run. Students participate in the Challenge to increase their fitness level and push themselves to reach new goals. Throughout the year, fourth graders continue to learn fitness concepts, participate in a variety of fitness development exercises, and learn to assess their personal fitness. 
     
    Each class period begins with running laps and participating in a series of stretches and strength activities, such as squats, chair sits and mountain climbers. In fourth grade, students are introduced to flag football and badminton in addition to participating in team sports such as soccer, kickball, volleyball, basketball, floor hockey, baseball, dodgeball, Pinball, Warden, Capture the Flag and Running Bases.
  • Fifth Grade

    Fifth grade is the final year of Lower School Physical Education, serving as a reinforcement of all sports skills and coordination skills the students have learned throughout their time in the Lower School. Fifth graders begin the year in Physical Education by participating in the Presidential Fitness Challenge. Students are able to compare their scores from the previous year’s Challenge to see how their fitness level has changed and improved. They continue to learn fitness concepts, participate in a variety of fitness development exercises, and learn to assess their personal fitness.  
     
    Each class period begins with running laps and participating in a series of stretches and strength activities, such as sit-ups, chair sits and lunges. In fifth grade, students are introduced to Ultimate Frisbee, European Handball and Socketball in addition to participating in team sports such as flag football, soccer, kickball, volleyball, badminton, basketball, floor hockey, baseball, dodgeball, pinball, Warden, Capture the Flag and Running Bases.

The Kew-Forest School

119-17 Union Turnpike
Forest Hills, NY 11375
(718) 268-4667
The oldest independent school in the borough of Queens, The Kew-Forest School is an independent co-educational, college preparatory school for students in Early Childhood Development (ECD) to 12th Grade.