Technology class provides students with opportunities to build critical thinking and problem-solving skills that translate to all areas of academic work, to increase proficiency in computer skills, and to build speed and accuracy in typing. The program is structured to help children learn to become innovative using different types of technology. It is our hope that with these skills, children will be able to use technology effectively while at Kew-Forest and throughout their lives. 
 
Students from ECD to second grade participate in Tinker Time programming. Tinker Time is an opportunity for students to do hands-on activities that relate to Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). They are encouraged during Tinker Time to work independently and collaboratively to answer questions about how things work, how materials work together to build things, and how to use elements of Design Thinking to solve problems. During Maker Morning assemblies, students have the opportunity to share their experiences in Tinker Time with the Lower School community. 
 
Third to fifth graders study typing and digital citizenship. In digital citizenship lessons, four units are discussed: digital information, which introduces technology by showing and explaining how computers and tablets are used; digital protection, which explains access and boundaries of technology for personal, home, and school use; digital consideration, in which students learn how to respect the work and words that belong to others and to use respectful words in your own work; and digital communication, which teaches students about different ways to communicate and how to choose the best way for different situations. Each lesson covers one or more of the four areas of digital citizenship: information, protection, consideration, and communication. The lessons rotate throughout the four areas to give students exposure to all areas simultaneously.
 
During the yearly Hour of Code event during national Computer Science Week, students have the opportunity to share experiences at as a Lower School at a cross-grade level to learn more about coding and explore how computer science can be used to solve problems.

List of 7 items.

  • Early Childhood Development

    In Technology class, students are introduced to touch technology, using iPads and applications that enhance what is being taught in the classroom. With iPads, students begin to learn the basic skills of using touch technology, such as opening and closing applications, typing on a virtual keyboard and sourcing information from the Internet. Students effectively use technology to help further their understanding of what has been taught in the classroom and to develop their creativity. As they begin to use technology in an educational setting, students learn that technology can be an effective tool for communication and collaboration. As the year progresses, the students are also introduced to robotics, using Beebots, to introduce step-by-step problem solving. 
  • Kindergarten

    The technology curriculum in Kindergarten builds on skills from Early Childhood Development (such as opening and closing applications, typing on a virtual keyboard, and sourcing information from the Internet) and introduces new areas of focus. The beginning of the year focuses on reviewing skills and the different types of technology that the students will be using during the year. In addition to using touch technology, Kindergarten students also begin working with laptop computers. 
     
    The students also continue to explore the fundamentals of programming using specially designed robots called Bee-Bots. Using the BeeBots, students learn the basics of step-by-step problem solving. Each lesson is designed to build critical thinking, which also translates to all areas of academic work. Each of these different technologies helps to develop their critical thinking skills, increase their understanding of different types of technology, and hone their creativity. They are also introduced to the Kinderlogo program, which helps them to create geometric designs using patterns and mathematical skills.
  • First Grade

    The first grade Technology students continue to use touch technology and learn basic computer skills. Using the various forms of technology, students are asked to create different projects to enhance their understanding of what is being taught in the classroom. Some favorite projects include creating a unique flag for a country during their World Day unit and learning about different shapes and creating them using a Geoboard application. 
     
    Students also develop their programming and problem solving skills using Beebots. Building on previously learned skills, students continue to develop problem solving skills by using the robot to navigate a variety of grid mazes using multiple commands and programming language. They also continue to develop their math skills while using the Kinderlogo program by using a variety of commands and patterns to create geometric designs.
  • Second Grade

    As students in the second grade become more fluent readers, they are introduced to web-based resources. Students learn how to find a bookmarked webpage, how to effectively navigate a webpage and how to log on and off a computer properly. Students are challenged to present the information that is learned in a creative way. A favorite project is the World Day graphic organizer, which helps students to organize their questions to focus their research about a particular country during their World Day unit. 
     
    Students also continue to work with touch technology and explore programming with the Bee-Bots. Building on previously learned skills, students continue to develop problem solving skills by using the robot to navigate a variety of grid mazes using multiple commands and programming language. Students also use software programs created for the BeeBots to demonstrate their understanding of control, directional language, and programming. Building on previously learned skills, students continue to use Kinderlogo, to help students learn beginning LOGO commands using different computer activities. Students also begin to use the LEGO WeDo robotics program, doing activities that foster the 4C learning process: Connect, Construct, Contemplate, and Continue.
  • Third Grade

    In third grade Technology class, students are introduced to Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint. Students learn basic formatting and work to build typing skills. A favorite project that helps to introduce the basic functions of PowerPoint is Mystery Animal, which helps to reinforce research skills that are learned in second grade. Students are also introduced to Scratch, an animation program that encourages creativity and step-by-step problem solving using visual blocks of code. The students continue to use touch technology and applications suitable for their grade level to complement what is being taught in the classroom. 
     
    In third grade, students are introduced to the Pro-Bot, a hybrid robot that combines the basic programming skills of a Beebot, but also uses coordinates and degrees to prepare them to learn the LOGO programming language in fourth grade.  Additionally, students continue to use the LEGO WeDo robotics program building upon the 4C learning process of Connect, Construct, Contemplate, and Continue. Students will continue to do activities that foster innovation and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). 
     
    Third grade begins our formal typing curriculum in which students are introduced to the Keyboarding Without Tears program to learn touch typing and Digital Citizenship.  Keyboarding uses activities to sharpen accuracy and fluency skills. With basic keyboarding well in hand, students practice with frequently rotating themes: Sing & Play, Famous Faces, Greek & Latin, Bones & Bodies, and Great Grammar. Spot checks are used to gauge student understanding of specific skills, and to measure speed and accuracy.
  • Fourth Grade

    The fourth grade students learn how to gather information using print and online resources, and how to store work in Google Drive. The students then create a PowerPoint slideshow about a favorite subject, which showcases their ability to use PowerPoint effectively. Students continue to work on their touch typing skills with emphasis on speed and accuracy. They continue to explore the Microsoft Office Suite by reviewing basic formatting skills in Word and creating different types of publications in Microsoft Publisher. Additionally, educational applications such as Math Doodles and Stack the States continue to complement classroom studies, furthering the student's understanding. 
     
    Students are introduced to Terrapin LOGO, which is a general-purpose programming language that is fun, intuitive and procedural. Using Terrapin LOGO will help foster problem solving skills, attention to detail, and procedural thinking that can be used in all subject areas. Additionally, students continue to use the LEGO WeDo robotics program building upon the 4C learning process of Connect, Construct, Contemplate, and Continue. Students will continue to do activities that foster innovation and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). During the Hour of Code, students have the opportunity to share experiences at as a Lower School at a cross-grade level to learn more about coding, and how computer science can be used to solve problems.  
     
    In fourth grade typing class, students continue to build on previously learned skills in third grade using Keyboarding Without Tears, and continue lessons in Digital Citizenship. Keyboarding Success activities uses keyboarding games to promote muscle memory, accuracy, and speed. Students practice formatting and typing skills with engaging and changing themes: Oh, Look! (visual arts), Greek & Latin, Go Geography, and Words & Writers. Spot checks are used to gauge student understanding of specific skills, and to measure speed and accuracy.
  • Fifth Grade

    The fifth grade students work to refine their independent research skills, which they demonstrate through completing research projects in the academic classroom. The students build on previously learned skills to gather information using print and online resources and store work in Google Drive. They also learn how to use Google Documents, Slides and Sheets. This allows them to work collaboratively at school and at home. They continue to explore the Microsoft Office Suite by reviewing basic formatting skills in Word and creating a different types of publications in Microsoft Publisher. Each student is expected to demonstrate good formatting skills using the Microsoft Office suite during the course of the year. 
     
    Students are encouraged to use imagination and creativity as they continue to work with LOGO to create geometric shapes and designs. Using elements of Design Thinking, they also continue to work with the LEGO WeDo robotics expansion course to continue to develop their critical thinking and problem solving skills.  During the Hour of Code, students have the opportunity to share experiences at as a Lower School at a cross-grade level to learn more about coding, and how computer science can be used to solve problems.  
     
    In fifth grade typing class, students continue their skills building activities using Keyboarding Without Tears. Students use Can-Do Keyboarding, which develops the accuracy and speed necessary to handle the demands of schoolwork and testing in higher grades. Formatting and typing skills are reinforced with engaging and changing themes: Start the Music, Super Words, People Power, and Water, Water! Spot checks are used to gauge student understanding of specific skills, and to measure speed and accuracy.

The Kew-Forest School

119-17 Union Turnpike
Forest Hills, NY 11375
(718) 268-4667
The oldest independent school in the borough of Queens, The Kew-Forest School is an independent co-educational, college preparatory school for students in Early Childhood Development (ECD) to 12th Grade.